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"browsing" Tag


Fishing Trip


Tuesday, May 6, 2014

fishintrip_1100

project by Annelotte Lammertse + Anouk Hoogendoorn

rapid data reproduction


Monday, April 7, 2014

 

SDesignblog_IndexAdresses_jpg

Looking at the history of my browsing, I find the fact that every page and every single piece of data on the design blog has its own little index/address very interesting. I feel like internet lives its own life. It is very much like a non stop growing organism and it is also expanding so fast. The designblog is a little part of that organism/creator. This screenshot shows the contrast between that short moment of browsing through the designblog and the very rapid data reproduction during that short moment.


Sunday, April 6, 2014

Browse-Image_1500

traffic highlights


Thursday, April 3, 2014

Melisa_BrowseImage_900
My traffic while browsing through the blog, including the posts and their content with highlights of posts that evoke my interest to stay and read. This is to show the experience and to evoke curiosity for others to explore the blog and it's content.

mapping my browse history


Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Mapping_Anouk_bw2

FURTHER DOWN THE INFORMATION HIGHWAY


Wednesday, October 6, 2010


The size of the indexed World Wide Web is 15.66 billion pages (http://www.worldwidewebsize.com).

The year is 1924. That’s a long time ago. That’s why this book smells of old grandpa.


The title is intriguing. “Woodcuts, and some words”. An honest title. Plain simple. As if the phrase “what you see is what you get” was authored for this book only. It doesn’t have a fancy wordplay. Someone once upon a time spilled coffee on it. Maybe also dropped a cigarette on it. Drank coffee and smoked cigarettes, while glancing to it’s precious content. This book I’m holding in my hand is some book. Extraordinary. Classic. Both fragile and pretentious at the same time. The thick papers, the fine composition on each page. So elegant and authentic. So anti-industrial, so handmade. This book can teach you how to make woodcuts…

- It’s like an old school version of one of the many ‘how-to’ videos on YouTube. I’m actually holding an offline version of a ‘how-to’ video. It makes me think of information, and how we approach and handle the nonstop floating information on the WWW.

What is the actual difference between information in a book and information on the internet, besides the limited/unlimited amount? I recall my teacher saying something like: “I will recommend you all to buy the book and not make scans and read them on your computer… because… it’s nicer, you know”. What makes us grab a book instead of browsing the web?

What is the fuss about a book in general? Is it because it’s capable of generating a certain feeling or a certain “vibe” which will never be generated from the most awesome and well-made webpage? Is it the typography on the paper, the quality of the paper, the fact that you can touch it and that it isn’t ongoing?

There’s an enormous difference between getting information from a book and getting information from the internet. I, myself, is having a hard time keeping track on the endless amount of available information on the internet. It’s interesting that the information about any subject on the internet is unlimited. It’s like having unlimited access to ‘knowledge’. There’s always more. You’re never finished. It’s ongoing. It will always follow time, never become obsolete.

The information in a book is not developing. There’s a last page. A period. It’s printed and can’t be changed in a sec. No further links. No sudden brand new pages. No updates. No hidden information. What you see is what you get. And *that* somehow puts the whole ‘info on the internet’ in perspective. You never see what you get, until it’s there. Always floating, constantly changing. Eternal information.


Rietveld > lib. cat. no: 755.1

Browsing The Library


Monday, November 16, 2009

The library is a vault of knowledge and place of opportunities and inspiring meetings if only you know the combination to open it up.

In an attempt to expose that hidden treasure for ourselves we have to find out what we are searching for. Not aimed at 1 specific objective question but in an effort to make our personal focus manifest. Searching and naming (tagging) our find.

What if…, we were to browse through it, just like we so often browse the Internet, on association and intuition? Would we be able to unlock it and find hidden treasures. We probably would and we might also find out why the fast information that we find on the internet, the superficial re-shuffling of opinionated facts and loads of images, desperately requires editing. We might find an answer to the question, why more books are printed than ever and libraries thrive.

40 students set out to “browse” the library in that state of mind, showing what happens if you just release your preconceptions and start doing it. All their adventures can be read under the category >“subjective library project<.
The tags they created in that process became part of the Designblog’s monumental tag list.


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