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"fabric" Tag


DRESS-INDEX #7


Monday, February 11, 2013

Gerrit Rietveld Academy. The building were I spend the most of my one hundred sixty eight hours the week has to offer. The building were I drink the most of my coffee , which I pick up in the canteen on the ground floor.

The canteen. There is my starting point.

When I look around I see a diagram of the clothes worn in Gerrit Rietveld. The canteen is a meeting point, were people from all departments as well as teachers and visitors take their coffee and have their meals. I find it interesting to sit there and look around. Nobody can know what I am thinking about and nobody cares.

I find it nice to look at the textiles, and since my background is in tailoring maybe it is almost an old habit. I try to realize if there is any trend going on. Is there particularly much of some certain kind of fabric? Printed? Colorful? Patch worked? Second hand? Do we have more woven fabric visible or is it knitted, felted or even leather fabric we see? And what content do the fibers have. Are they made out of processed animal hair or plants so we can call them natural? Or are they more on the synthetic spectrum? Sometimes it is hard to see and then it comes to guessing…

After writing randomly down what is to see in the canteen on a regular day I decided to make myself a system; to take snapshots and analyze them. I took one before lunch and one in the lunch brake. By analyzing the photographs, which should give me a quite good overview on the average dress code in the academy, I calculated the ratio between the textile fibers and the processes they have been put in.

As you can see the ratio between the natural fibers and the once that are either synthetic or mixed with synthetics is 40 % versus 60 %. That means that out of 5 cloths 2 will be made out of natural fibers and 3 of synthetic related material.

On the other histogram you can see that woven and knitted material is what we have most of in our surrounding, but since shoes are often made of leather, the leather bar has some value as well.

 

When it came to making an outfit related to the research I decided to choose weaving as a method, since weaving and knitting are the main processes of the fibers in Rietveld surrounding according to my results. I wanted to work with raw material, and since wool and cotton are the most common natural fibers in (Rietveld) clothing I choose to work with sheep wool among with fish skin, which I count as leather. The weaving I did in a very primitive  way to match the rest of the working process. I wanted to keep the process of the fiber out of my work, and that worked better in combination with very course weaving. The headpiece I made to make more harmony in the outfit, since the woolen outfit is quite overwhelming on its own and in that way I could also represent a suitable ratio of leather in the outfit according to my research.

At last I wanted to show layers, since we most of the times have many layers on ourselves in everyday life. I decided to stick with the raw material and the weaving method worked well for this. I took several kinds of plastic, which can be recycled and processed into textile fibers, as well as fish skin and bast, and wove them into the structure.


Auspicious Tangents


Wednesday, April 21, 2010

FAMILIAR DOMESTICS

Most living spaces use textiles as membranes and interfaces. When we sleep at night we inhabit an almost entirely textile place. We imagine extending familiar textile aplications into the built environment to create fully integrated textile architecture inspired by biological systems.
One of the domestic textiles we have been focusing on is a window covering. Making such a design responsive alow it to grow, metabolise and synthesise with qualities in its immediate surroundings. It can be light emitting, temperature regulating, structural and adaptive.
Folowing along this trajectory is a world of materials that truly facilitate the relationship between the inside and the outside. They are no longer inert matter, but active and able to respond to stimuli such as light, heat, water and electrical energy


Geophysical Log: Location: Loop.pH studio London UK Date: 10/04/2007 Time: 22:12:39

GEODESIC DISTANCE

Looking at plants spinning, weaving and knotting themselves around features in their environment, we cannot but think how they inspired humans to manipulate fiber and thread.
It is the nature of many plants to climb and attach themselves tangentially to establish a structurally stable and energetically efficient link. In the image below, can be seen a knotted end of a tentacle that a passion flower uses to anchor in space.
The two black rods are a fiber composite and part of a woven space-frame we are developing for plants to grow into and consume. The space-frame uses tangential joints exclusively and could easily be scaled to fit many life-form’s requirements.


Geophysical Log: Location: Domestic Things, Flow Gallery London UK Date: 18/03/2007 Time: 12:37:55

INTERDEPENDECE VS. DEPENDENCE

A woven textile is an example where many individual fibres, weak when singular, provide great strengh in unison as they interlink and cross one another. The language of textiles is often used to describe systems in our world that overlap and work together to create a harmony.
The construction of fabrics can be described as a parallel for co-existence and inter-dependence in a sociological context. An urban fabric is interwoven with people, neighborhoods, homes, work places and institutions an a community is strengthened when diversity is present.

tangent (raaklijn) . go off at a ~ (een gedachte sprong maken)

Selection of 3 texts out of 10 by Loop.pH [Mathias Gmachl and Rachel Wingfield], published in "Responsive Textile Environments" edited by Sarah Bonnemaison and Christine Macythe Canedian Design Research Network. source: Over/Under, Under/Over . notes . Txt(textile) Department . June 2008


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