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"volume" Tag


We sense volume before we can articulate it


Friday, October 19, 2012

 

Marie De Bruyn makes monumental objects out of hand blown glass alongside video work and wooden constructions resulting in hybrid installations. Apart from the making process she is interested in integrating objects in a specific setting, creating atmospheres where the viewer can engage in a physical relation towards the objects and their surrounding space. Similar to Brancusi’s sculptural permutations – arranging and re-arranging the space in between his sculptures – the placing of an object is as important as the object itself.

Her work is about the relation between the perception of inner and outer. ‘How do we deal with our (surrounding) space? How do we position ourselves towards ourselves, the people around us, and the objects taking place in a given situation?’ The theses then discusses the function of the surrounding in the work of Dan Graham and those of body and space in the work of Richard Serra

 


Download thesis : We sence volume before we can articulate it [in dutch]

[images of Marie de Bruyn's graduation show

 

All in All: We’re just Volumes


Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Mr. Henk just loves his iPhone. Mr. Henk just loves books too, but soon there will be the iPad. The iPad may mark the end of the book as we know it. So all good things must go, and in a few years graphic design won’t be the same. Guttenberg’s Galaxy has stood out for centuries, with the printed book as the ultimate vessel for information, but through cyberspace we enter a different world.

It’s kind of sad, but inevitable, or is it?

“It just doesn’t matter,” Mr Henk replies.  ”A book is an iPad is a volume. Period.” I’m a bit surprised by Mr. Henk’s reply. I thought in graphic design you had those I-will-only-work-in-print-and-I’d-rather-die-than-do-websites-people. But apparently Mr. Henk likes the feel and smell of paper just as much as he is touched by his iPhone.

I picked up You Shall Know Our Velocity by Dave Eggers from my McSweeney’s bookshelf as my favorite object.

“Now did it become an illusive project from the start, as you selected a book as your object?” Mr. Henk continues.

Well, I don’t know…

Apparently, you have those you-shall-only-design-from-pure-form-and-only-that-product designers that don’t use text. I don’t mean to be rude, but the pure forms that come out of that won’t get Plato out of his cave. They are forms without ideas. You get the usual design stuff, like vases, chairs, lamps. Stuff you can get at Pols Potten, right?

Now, if you add text, you might get good concepts as well. You might get design I really might get attached to, just as Mr. Henk loves iPhones.

So then I read Timothy McSweeney had died (who is: The Ballad Of T. McSweeney). To me – one who still reads and runs – the form became all too clear. A book is a volume is a box and so is a body: they’re both volumes of content. So I chose to make a box out of cat litter because it resembles the ashes of the deceased. Ashes to Ashes becomes form to form, quite cradle to cradle that is, closing the circle

boekendoos

boekendoos

spin spun spun


Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Form did not follow function.

This exercise device that is designed to keep your waist in fantastic condition is visually something that could be an illustration or of decorative means in its most minimal way by being almost two-dimensional.

Its rounded corners on the edges and the repetitive voluminous circular lines add a wavy aspect to the object and give it air and continuity.

Taking the two above mentioned aspects and consequently use these principles as a departure point, designing headgear seemed utterly natural. The sort of headgear that would follow the shape and size of the head, but eventually alter its original state.


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