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"movement" Tag


Abeceda NOW


Monday, May 21, 2018

 

ABECEDA 1926

 

 In 1926, the Czech dancer Milca Mayerova choreographed the alphabet as a photo-ballet.

Each move in the dance is made to the visual counterpoint of Karel Teige’stypographic music.

Teige was a constructivist and a surrealist, a poet, collagist, photographer, typographer and architectural theorist, and his 1926 photomontage designs for the alphabet are a uniquely elegant and witty invention, and one of the enduring masterpieces of Czech modernism.

 

Abeceda

 

 

In the graphic design world, movement refers to the path of a viewer’s eyes as he or she looks at your work. Since movement can add such a large sense of unity in design, it plays a significant role in the ceration process. By tying the different elements of a design together in a specific way, you can control the movement of your viewer’s eyes throughout the medium. As a different media, body does the same thing in ABECEDA 1926 photo-ballet. There is the different movement which is more analog, natural and already exist but still a path of a viewer’s eyes as he or she looks at the work, using the body and an action as a method of design. Despite the fact that the terms action and surface are disconnected even opposite things.

 

 

Letters get created

by movements > Movements who

literally give the sound exhaling.

''A'' LETTER

In our case of the Abeced Alphabet an example

with the first letter of the alphabet, the letter ‘A’.

The body language of reaching towards the sky asking an ‘A’. 

But expressing ‘Aas confidence standing tall, putting your hands in your wrist, chin up.

So one single letter can have a wider scala of meaning.

expressing A

A letter without  a sound of the voice, a movement of the hand can be like an incomplete inform. Just an ”A” on a paper.

 

 

Body language who is connected to words is a missing factor in language these days. Digitalization is transforming things into less natural outcomes. Graphic design is most likely a quite digital world. Which is interesting is relating those two opposite sides; the digitalized, formulized and made as a stabilized, structured letters out of the natural, smooth, changing, body movement. Even we can find some elements from both sides in all the sides, still the texting, mailing and internet talk has no presence of body and sound which is ironic because we generally attend to imitate the existing features that we know, take them as a starting point or repeat them.

 

We can see the first examples of this attend in the ”Cave Paintings”. Cave paintings are also known as “parietal art”. They are painted drawings on cave walls or ceilings, mainly of prehistoric origin, dated to some 40,000 years ago (around 38,000 BCE) in Eurasia. The exact purpose of the Paleolithic cave paintings is not known. Evidence suggests that they were not merely decorations of living areas since the caves in which they have been found do not have signs of ongoing habitation. They are also often located in areas of caves that are not easily accessible. The paintings are remarkably similar around the world, with animals being common subjects that give the most impressive images. Humans mainly appear as images of hands, mostly hand stencils made by blowing pigment on a hand held to the wall.

Some theories hold that cave paintings may have been a way of communicating with others.

 

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The body and other elements are using for communication in a way with ”movement/action of the body and also in a way with ”captured frames such as; paintings, photographs, and even typography as visuals. So we can really understand the idea of connecting body language with the captured, reflected typography together.

 

 

designtheory5

 

According to that point and various examples, we can tell that art may imitate life. The movement, the performance reflected and created an alphabet. But could it possibly be possible to create an alphabet without any reflections from life?

 

Performative communication


Monday, May 21, 2018

Hi Luna,

So let’s make a resume of what have been discussed and where did the direction went. 

We start by relating those to type of font for their quality of being created by one repetitive movement, one single infinite repeated shape.
In the thread type, it’s the circle that you make to go through the fabric, while in the second font, the shape of an 8 or infinity is repeated in different sizes in order to fill up all the empty spaces that the letters leave.
 
Font LunaFont Agathe copyWhat does differentiate that than classic handwriting? Well, because in handwriting, the constant of the shape is not equal : the movement of the line needs to change for creating different symbols and letters.So let’s take this as a focus of research : what are other systems of one movement fonts ? How do they work and why did the designers decided to create it. Why would it be attractive to create these type of font ? And how this repetition imply the body – after all, these repetitions of movements for making a font with a thread come from a body movement.

I found this guy on the internet yesterday, https://twitter.com/ootori_t
It’s a bit different from our first trough but in a way, his work is still around our question of movement and repetitive font. He’s trying to make a fond relating Braille alphabet and “visual” alphabet (the international one and the Japanese one).
Tell me what you think about !
Love xxx
———————————————————–
 
 
Hey Agathe, 
 
I think its super interesting topic, I feel its a deconstruction of writing into a smaller concept, somehow like if the letter was an atom, and then we go from there to the electrons, I feel the construction of the atom by the constant movement of electrons resonates on the construction of a letter based on one repetitive movement. Kosuke Takahashi looks very amazing, a new idea of integrating both alphabets, finding the common link between them. 
  Captura de pantalla 2018-05-21 a las 14.36.44 copy
I also thought about performative movement for language and got into morse code as a performative alphabet. It all is based on repeating one movement, constantly. Found out two Spanish artists, Moon Ribas and Neil Harbisson have done a performance with morse code, just speaking by biting. Both of them had a bluetooth tooth, which vibrated on the other’s mouth. I find it pretty interesting how morse code could be taken to another levels of language now-a-days.
MesaCyborg_Day5-2882
Not only with technologies but also in other artistic fields, I was investigating about graphic design and looks like there’s also a visual co-relation to the dashes and the dots of morse code when it comes to visual arts. There’s an alphabet that visually explains or adds morse to it, maybe it could be a way to represent morse code in a graphic design way.
52e788ef1d0346a1b73fd789a67bafa7 
 
L, L.
———————————————————–

 

Hello Luna,

I really like your comparaison between Takahashi’s work and the formation of an atome. It also completely relates to morse code,
see this panel :
Screen Shot 2018-05-21 at 17.01.58 copy
So this tree explains the formation of the translation of a letter to morse code, constructed step by step from an element with another to articulate a sign, which will articulate a langage with other signs. Like cells, let’s say ?In the field of art, precisely in music, it remind me of two things.
This first is a bit famous, Glenn Gould. He’s mostly know for his interpretations of J.S. Bach’s . Goldberg Variations,
see there : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ah392lnFHxM&t=344s. If some find his way to play piano extremely cold and mathematic, I actually found his play a clear way to “ear” a partition and understand the composition of the music. I don’t know so much about music, but he seems to me “cutting” the sound in different states that I can visualise better the written langage the sounds come from.
For being honest, he’s the musician who made me understand music in general and appreciate contemporary electronic music. And probably not by accident : In contrary to most classic interpret at that time, he decided to work his play for the recording more than making concerts, implying on the fact that people who would listen to his music would need to manage their radio and sono at home, and in that way, his public would need to participate to the music to make it each time their own.
Another is this partition for Jean-Philippe Rameau, La poule (the chicken). He’s a composter from the end of the 15th and begening of the 16th century who made this research of repetition in music. As you can see the partition, the notes are constructed (as we said on the morse code and braille alphabet) in a repetitive way while creating a system. Visually, it seems extremely repetitive, and quite modernist.
la poule
But the result is playful. Let’s say that creating an organised system of codification does not involve making something serious with it, ha ha. Here is a video of the performance by Grigory Sokolov,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcXY7dyK7eQ ; I really enjoy watching the movement of the body around this play.
Xx
———————————————————–
 Hey.
In general, all this elements that are summed up here have in common the fact that they are all performative, or better said, all the research comes to a common field which is the performance. Not only is about reading or writing anymore, but about acting. The movement becomes an essential part of all of the elements. The typography is not anymore about reading/writing communication but also about expressing it with other parts of the body, some of them not vocal, or even with external elements. 
 

the pleasure of the unknown


Monday, October 24, 2016

 

P1360433
 
Guy DEBORD - Concept of "Derive"
How could people renounce to act, to move into a defined space?

“Follow the line. Walk. Turn left. Straight on. Turn right.”
Everyday is the same way. Wake up, go to work, one way. Finish work, go back home, same way. Same streets. Same sidewalk. Same hall. Same way to move into a defined space. I’m bored. I have the feeling of being programmed. I walk as an automate. The way I’m moving is determined by the space. A space, which has been built to create a certain kind of movement. Movements chosen by the hand of the architect.
I’m bored.
I want to derive.
I want to EXPLORE.
I want to be excited.
Let’s break the routine.
Let’s take the chances as a guide.
Let’s follow the chances.
The derive is defined by Guy Debord (a French Marxist theorist, writer, filmmaker, member of the Letterist International, founder of a Letterist faction, and founding member of the Situationist International) as a fast technical way to go through different atmospheres. It is deeply linked to the space and to how people recognize it. The right words are “the psychogeographical thought”.

The human being evolves during his life through different spaces. He is acting, moving because of his feelings but also because of the space he is in itself. If the space is small, without windows, just made of walls, he will turn around in circles like a wild beast, searching for some space to explore. Put him into a wide space, with no walls, maybe he will run, maybe he will walk but he will have the freedom to explore. The space, thus, determines our behavior.
The chances has an important repercussion on the derive, even if the mind and feelings about the space, are still the elements which affect your choices. You’re walking in the street without any goal, you want to get lost, to explore. To your left, there is a narrow passage, it seems calm and quiet. To your right, there is a big street, noisy and full of people. Which one would you choose? Which path will attract you the most? Your feelings will help you choose.
The derive is something you can do by yourself, alone, but it has more impact in a small group. People can help you discover different places you don’t know, they can help you appreciate it. Also, a group of 4/5people maximum can create a different energy than if you were just by yourself.
 

arton38

 
The exploration supposes a kind of calculus which helps you to know where you are going. That’s what the map is for. In your daily life, you just know the streets you need to take to be at specific places. Take a map and start to look at what is around you will help you to understand how the city is built and how you can play with it.
“What if today, I decide not to turn left but I chose to go right, to get to my office?”
A small change of your routine can have a very positive impact on you. Your attention will be different so you will start to feel the pleasure of the unknown.

First cover Guy Debord’s book

In architecture, the derive creates new spaces, new ways to go, to move and to determine the space. 

Everyday you take the lift, go to the 3rd floor and open the second door on the left to your office. No excitation. Tomorrow, you will climb the stairs, try a new way to move and you will rediscover a place you thought you knew.

Why not create a place where the owner could remove the walls to make the space bigger or smaller? A place where he could be his own architect, a place where, he has everyday, the possibility to create his own space. For example, in 1955 a building was built in New-York in which three four room apartments could be turned into a big twelve room apartment thanks you moving walls.
Also, one of the most famous architecture of De Stijl movement, the “Schröder House”, illustrates very well this idea of transformable space. The Rietveld Schröder House in Utrecht was built in 1924 by Dutch architect Gerrit RIETVELD for Mrs. Truus Schröder-Schräder and her three children. She commissioned the house to be designed preferably without walls. It is visually very simple with its use of primary colors and geometric shapes. The outside-inside boundaries seem to blur, thanks to its many windows that open up completely to welcome nature indoors.
 
mulder-rietveld-schroder-house-living-room mulder-rietveld-schroder-house
 
This house is a great exemple of a home you could easily transform to suit the weather, your mood. The simple and straightforward house was made using long-lasting, affordable and standard materials like concrete, glass and wood, with floors made from rubber and even some small cork areas in the bedrooms, for standing when getting out of bed. A doorbell and a long horizontal window that only open a small area to receive the post straight to the working desk inside. Upstairs, three bedrooms and a living room area around a central staircase and fireplace can be dynamically turned into a open big open space when opening wide up the sliding the walls.
The whole idea of derive deeply echoes Constant’s work. After WW2, the artist saw the destroyed cities as a possibility to rebuild them in a different way. He started to think about a New Babylon, a city that would offer to his citizens a new way of life, a new way to explore the space. Stairs, ladders, open spaces, light… Everything in his mock ups gave the user the possibility to create his own space, his own movements, his own rules. On a certain level, we can say that Constant wanted to give us the possibility to derive. This idea echoes Guy Debord ’s sentence, “One day, people will build cities to derive”.
To my mind, i think that with or without those utopic cities, we already have the possibility to derive. As human beings, we are building our own limits. If we decide to see our everyday life as a playground, if we push ourselves out of our landmarks, out of our comfort, we became the actors of our derive. The main problem of derive is finally how we accept to deal with the notion of freedom, the freedom we are giving to ourselves.

Cyberflânerie


Tuesday, January 14, 2014

The thesis of Olya Troitskaya “Virtual walking” studies a gesture of strolling in physical and cyberspace.

It looks into the history of a “deliberate walk”, starting from the concept of the flâneur developed by Charles Baudlaire, its degradation by capitalism into the figure of the shopper, its later radical political update coming with the concept of the “dérive”, its development through a notion of “Psychogeography” with Guy Debord and Situationist International and its popularity later in 1990s in artistic and academic circles, building up psychogeographical praxis in various ways.

Physiologie_du_flaneur
Louis Adrien Huart / Physiologie du flâneur

Further the thesis draws a parallel between these historical processes happening in the real space to the ones taking place in the cyberspace.
With the development of capitalism flânerie becomes increasingly restricted. Is it possible that Cyberspace, that can be looked at as an update of a personal, bodily and architectural space, would become a more popular place for flânerie?
If in the 1990s “cyberflânerie” is associated with a free “strolling through information space, taking in the virtual architecture and remaining anonymous”(1), then in 2000s it doesn’t seemed such an intriguing activity as in the early days of the Web.

The processes happening to the internet in 2000s can be considered similar to ones happening in 19th century Paris, lead to the change of its original, playful identity.

live-rmb-city-1
Cao Fei / China Tracy, 'Live in RMB City'(2009) Video
: Courtesy of Artist and Vitamin Creative Space

Various artistic practices are being developed around a cyber stroll. Will they react to the changes happening to the figure of cyberflâneur and challenge its appropriation by capitalism, similar to Debor’s challenging capitalism’s hold over the city? (x) http://www.ceramicstoday.com/articles/051998.htm, last accessed: 06.09.2013

What is the future of the cyberflâneur? Is it possible to learn from Situationist’s example? Where to look for the “dérive” in cyberspace?

text by Olya Troitskaya [graduate student department of Graphic Design 2013] : more www.olyatroitskaya.com

 

Pdf-icon Download this thesis ”Virtual Walking“

 

Fluid Fabrics


Tuesday, April 10, 2012

 

Probably the most fascinating part of the work of fashion designers Niels Klavers and Astrid van Engelen, is the special role given to the deliberate choice of material as the main ingredient of the design, which influences and shapes the garment (as they describe in the short video/interview Dutch Profile: Klavers Van Engelen). And what particularly fascinates me is the material referred to as the decisive factor of the final product and I will try to describe how the fabric becomes such a strong and inspirational object. The Designers` concept is based on this approach and it is evident that they want the fabric to get its own independent life when it is worn by the model. It moves and creates its peculiar visual  spectacle. That is why the designers Klavers and Engelen said that one cannot capture the whole of the design in a still picture as there is way more to see beyond the precise recorded instance of a shot. And there I can insist on the importance of those few minutes (ephemeral but also intensively documented) of the fashion show as the playground where the garments can perform. However, the shots are essential as they represent the source that the wide public can see. The selected audience that get the chance to attend the show, is thrilled by the wild appearance of the fabric while it is exposed in its most adventurous moment.

Coming from an art school, which apparently creates a different starting point compared to the background of other foreign fashion designers that studied at a regular fashion schools. These designers start working conceptually until the ideas develop naturally into an autonomous form. I recognize in this the “fingerprint” of the Gerrit Rietveld academy style that shapes the way of working and thinking, in the same way we, basic year students are educating our own visual language during these years of studying at the academy. What really surprised me is the manner in which the designers managed to implement all the practices that I see everyday in school, in such a rich and fulfilling way. Although their first garments were more constructivist and conceptual, they later developed into more wearable collections that keep the same tactility of the pure form and material.

 

Klavers Van Engelen

 

Seeing the work as if it is an enchanted talisman that is liberated as soon as it gets out of the stiff folding on the closet shelve, it also becomes a way of dealing with and approaching the material. I could add almost with respect not afraid to explore all its opportunities to the maximum. The moment that the fabric is released from the packaging, it suddenly becomes that creature that reflects light and communicates with the person that animates it. They treat the material as a living source that inspire their creations and give shape to the final products. Even though the designers try to keep the shape as simple as possible (sometimes just a rectangular piece of fabric with a cut), it still is very open for so many options and highly rich in its visuals, while the person can choose her/his own way of wearing it. That is why I may add that the delicate choice of the fabric as the raw material for the product, is indeed very beautiful in itself and carefully highlight every time when the garment is put into motion. The material speaks by itself determination the strictly sensory way of perceiving it at first glance when the audience is fascinated by that ”what it can do”.

“And it doesn’t move gently either, it becomes wild. The reaction we often hear is: have you seen how that moves! Wow, it`s amazing!” The choice of material is very important. The swishing and swirling of an animated garment is so very different then if it were captured in the photo”

The idea of the piece of clothing moving wildly and captivating the viewer is fascinating. I keep imagining a bond created between the designer and the fabric but also between the person wearing it and the clothing item.

What is this relationship based on? Is it exclusively sensory or more than that? From my own experience, when I visited The Fashion Foam and saw the first Klavers van Engelen design , I was captivated by that intense dark blue and the way the garment that they presented, more like a sculpture than a piece of clothing. It raised questions of what it may be and how it would look on a model or if I would have it in my hands. At first there is this very instinctive urge to touch it to see how it feels and then wondering and imagining how it would look like in another environment. Furthermore, what does it mean that it is presented in this way? I like the challenging way of exhibiting a fashion design that it almost detach from the wearable part but anyway, brings it back to its original meaning because of the context and space it is displayed in.

In conclusion, I would like to come back to my main reflective point which is the material choice in relation with Klavers van Engelen designs. The fabric is our starting point and the most recent collections have evolved from the horizontal.”  Their approach is quite simple and doesn’t involve pattern making or a lot of sketching but rather a hands-on way of working. What is important is the exploration of the material by researching all its opportunities and on top of all, the relation with the human body. Wrapping the fabric around the body and see what shape it gets is the easiest way of getting to know what they are looking for. The fabric has its own language that is translated visually as soon as it is wrapped around the model.

“You can tie a square around your hips and you have a skirt, that`s the simplest approach, but what other options are there for creating a form.”


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