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Chaos and order (comment)


Monday, April 14, 2014

 
fotosbook_0002a
Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 6.10.24 PM
 
The text is based on the Dutch architect and graphic designer Hendrik Wijdeveld’s text about “Chaos and order in the modern city life“. The blog-post starts with:

“Chaos and order in its most extreme form can be used as a formula for practically everything. From the beginning of time to the death of universe.”

The blogpost also refers to the Saussurean constructionist’s who believe that you cannot understand a word until you are aware of its opposite. To understand order you need a understanding of chaos. A lot of focus in the blog-post is on the Universe and life/death in relation to order and chaos. To grasp this huge questions is not simple and I tried to relate the idea of chaos and order on myself.

If you see “order and chaos” from a personal perspective chaos and order are essential elements of daily life. It is impossible to have order everywhere. Chaos is somehow always present. It is as if you are just able to focus on order for some elements of your life at the same time. When you focus on one part and create an order other parts will be in a state of chaos. A very literal example is an article I read about that it exists two types of people the type who is spending a lot of time on cleaning and therefore can find everything fast and the type that is living in chaos but does spend a lot of time looking for things. Both types are spending the same amount of time but some are creating order and others do search in chaos.
 

about those…


Sunday, April 13, 2014

 
uncategorized?

like not black
not white
not even gray
why can’t you define this time?
define define divide define
no category
what about you?
what’s your favorite category anyway?
well, what’s your category anyway?
feel better while categorizing, not this time
no gender, no nationality, no ideology, no what, now what?
no nothing
nothing
nothing
something
some thing
some think
thin thin thin thin thin
line between defined and undefined
they are neutral, they are lost, or just hard to define
that’s it

in the end not such a bad category.
 

Weaving through the paradoxes and dilemmas in protesting


Wednesday, April 9, 2014

After clicking around this Designblog, I came across the post about Caroline Lindos thesis work ”The Surface of Protest”.  The post is called ”Creating Destruction” which i find quite an intriguing contradiction. In her thesis project Caroline Lindo is investigating the meaning of protesting, different ways of doing so and which meaning they each imply. She essentially aims at answering the question: ”What is the most efficient – yet morally just – way of protesting?”

I would indeed like to know the answer to this question.

Lindo is directly relating the rules and structures of society and economics to the craft of weaving which appearantly is also quit a rigid system (written in the attached PDF). Lindo tells us of have the warp (the amount of lenghtwise yarns, that are held in tension within a frame, for threads to go under and over), within the art of weaving, has symbolized the basic strucure of living which humans have to accept. The weft (the thread or yarn pullede through the warp) represents all the choises and decisions humans make for themselves in life.

Skærmbillede 2014-04-09 kl. 10.45.10

I find this symbolism quite moving.

To me it seems that with this as the background, Lindo is reconcidering which weft to take, instead of using the one given to her by society. Can you even make a protest using the ”weft” given to you by society or do you have to cut all of these threads and come up with new ones yourself? Will anything constructive aspire from this? Is it hypocracy to use the tread – the means, structure, enviroment given by society – in making protest? Or is it not? These are all questions ahe is envistigating  througout her thesis.

As a research field she attended Occupy Amsterdam, which went worldwide in 2008 as a reaction on the financial crisis. She is studying the way of protesting through the tent-cities, which occured during the same events. I always find it quite striking whenever someone manages to making such an abstract theme tangible, as Lindo does.

 

 

#wow


Sunday, April 6, 2014

#interesting #easytofollow #slowfashion #slowcouture #painted #fashioncollective #processing #newfashionideology #slower #sublimitedfashion #wellwritten #spendingtime #takingtime #doingnothing #importantnothing #reflecting #understandable #makingbyhand #inspiring #bulgarianneedlepoint #timeisgold #nomultitasking #notime #forgottentechniques #hybridfashion #meditation #japanisetradition #repairclothes #workshop #brokenclothes #makingnew #startingagain #somethingdifferent #notcategorizing #ontheedgeoffashion #nocatwalk #nocollections #notrends #work #constantchange #fragility #history #inprocess #manydesigners #garmentgrows #noplans #collaborativefashion #story #handmade #value #questioningmoney #timeinvestment #imformative #links #endwithmusic #personalexperience #balanced #explained #2013 #research

#rediscover

#fashionwithagoldtread

 

Brilliant strawberry: i’d like to be interrupted


Sunday, April 6, 2014

briljant-aardbei_small

Daaaaaauuuuwwwwww-iiiiiiiiissssssss-mmmmmmmmmmeeeeee the rhythm of Taoism. My target is in the horizon, going into the substance of the clouds. I’m not looking around for some initial solutions nor I want to expand my way of seeing things, but if you’re thinking about doing it, do it without limitations. I will not insult the standards of human being or pretend that I do not have any emotions. I just don’t believe in classification.

1-2-3-:^9


Saturday, April 5, 2014

ffff

 

Jumping around through these images in Designblog,

back to essay this title ’1-2-3 Jewel’ caught my eyes.

An essay about jewelry? Cool ,lets check out.

Not only its pretty graphic design and pinky pinky makes you happy, the content is really good.

For me hand made jewelry is unique, you can feel so much more than mass manufactured accessories.

And it’s always a great gift option for special occasions.

It’s so nice to read about the graduates, after spending so much time in Rietveld and staying in the Jewelry department.

What is their understandings or maybe personal relationships and reflection on jewelry.

To see how they find their own way through different approaches, experiments and observations,

finally to see where they are standing now.

Are you an artist or a craftsman?

Are you making wearable jewelry or object for contemplation?

Does it matter? Does it not matter?

Sometimes I pass their department several times a day when I have to go to workshops,

then I start to guess how many people are working there on their table now:

Glue, hammer, burn, bang bang.

Pretty in color and form. Another jewelry is born.

 

 

sorry


Thursday, April 3, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-04-03 at 15.55.20

Screen Shot 2014-04-03 at 15.54.08

error404

“ants”


Thursday, April 3, 2014

Screen shot 2014-04-03 at 3.49.56 PM

I like when the science and academic world comes in together with design and art. Makes it interesting, and you learn new things and get a new insight. When you refer to natural things it is something everyone can relate to, and it makes you realize how present nature always is.

Ants are fascinating creatures, which are used in design and art too. The way the post is written is good and easy read, you get introduced in the subject immediately. These kind of posts that refer to other “worlds” and facts makes me interested in researching new subjects and other media. When a text makes you think and reflect, it is a good text and it reminds you too keep your eyes open to different subjects and how they can relate. Personal opinions together with facts is a good combination.

 

This lamp


Thursday, April 3, 2014

lamp3

http://designblog.rietveldacademie.nl/?p=276

From the archives, Friday, May 23, 2008: This is a great, lovely post about an iconic, green lamp. Unfortunately it is in dutch! I will translate it for you:

 

Famous lamp” (the title)

“I stumbled upon this banker’s lamp in the house of a friend. It’s now located in my study. The shade of the lamp is made of glass, the base is made of brass.” (accidental rhyme in translation, that’s not there in original text.)

“The lamp radiates a wise, calm and dedicated mood.” I’m not sure if I understood what the writer meant with this and if I translated this correctly.

“This lamp achieved a place in movies, courtrooms and reading rooms and through this it became an icon.” Or was it the other way around? Could also be.

“In the link below, the lamp became an icon in a literal way.” Some of the links are now broken, it might be because of this I could not find this literal way of becoming an icon.

“The image of the lamp is familiar, nearly kitsch. I find it nice to see objects in a different surrounding, in this case my work space, in which these obtain a different meaning.” I’m not sure I understand this different meaning of the lamp, since their study is a similar room to a reading room which is mentioned before as a place where this lamp is very commonly used.

 

provided links:

http://moviesharkdeblore.com/html/final_wrap_2005.html

http://www.cabelas.com/

http://www.tiffany-lamp-lighting.org/tiffany-bank-lamp.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_eyeshade

http://www.emeralite.com/history.html

 

tags: icon?Suddenly there are doubts wether this lamp is an icon?

 

I think it’s a great post, especially translated to English. It sounds very forced and uncomfortable even though the person really likes the lamp (I think). I like this contradiction. My aunt has the same lamp and I love my aunt, so there’s a personal connection between me and this text too.

ON TEMPORARY EXPERTISE


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

TemporaryExp1_redu TemporarExp2_redu

 

Temporary Expertise is a workshop by Eugenie deLariviere (Design Academy Master/UnBornLab) and Henk Groenendijk (Professor/Modorator of Designblog) in cooperation with the Department of Design (DesignLab).

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, DesignResearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and then DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

This project proves how important the final step of conclusion –finding out what the project is all about– is. Getting rid of the intention and understanding, analyzing what you did

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

 

ON FUNCTIONALITY


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Esther Frank* and Kjersti Alm Eriksen and NicolasChuard and Salomé Roodenburg* on functionality

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON MATERIALIZING EXPERIENCE


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Pierre Niviere and Lisa van der Breggen* talking together on the subject of materializing experience

'Think Inside My Box' movie

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON QUESTIONING


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Fabian Bergmark* [and Sjoerd Schunselaar] questioning an object

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON SOCIETY


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Emma Bienfait* and Sophie Wartenbergh talking together on the subject of Society

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON RETHINKING PIANO


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Tomas Ermin* and Maria Arnardottir talking together on the subject of rethinking piano

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

ON MAKING COFFEE


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Martina Turini* and Matilda Beckman talking together on the subject of getting people talking

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON EXPERIENCING LANDSCAPE


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Darius Blokker and Dimitra Chrysovergi* talking together on experiencing landscape

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON UTOPIA


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Bernadeta Rimutyte* and Jens Toni Willumsen talking together on the subject of Utopia

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON AN ODE TO A FONT


Tuesday, April 1, 2014


 

Chelsea Peterson* and Waël ell Allouche talking together about an ode to a font

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON BEING LOST


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Max Daalhuizen and Ida Hansen* talking together about the subject of being lost

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON DEMOCRATISING DESIGN


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Rixta van der Molen* and Frank van ‘t Woudt talking together on the subject of democratising design

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING NAIVE


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Casper Braat and Bára Bjarnadóttir* talking together about the importance of being naive

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON STORY TELLING


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Pedro Herrero Ferrran* and Marko Bakovic talking together about the subject of story telling

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON WORKING WITH YOUR INTUITION


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 

 

Arthur Maduro and Nadja Henss* talking together about the subject of working with your intuition

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilise. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designreseach and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and then DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON OPTIMAL SHAPES


Wednesday, March 26, 2014

 

 

Kristine Bech Sorensen and Jurigis Lietunovas* talking together about the subject of optimal shapes

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

ON THE BUBBLE


Wednesday, March 26, 2014

 

 

Salomé Roodenburg* and Nicolas Chuard talking together about the subject of working within the ‘Rietveld bubble’

 

Each project that students initiate, makes them into temporary experts on given topics. Art & Design schools then become knowledge hubs where different expertise cross fertilize. By looking at what types of research students engage in, Designresearch and UnBornLab organized a 'workshop' to investigate design matters from a students' perspective.

Through a series of short video's students from both the Foundation Year and the DesignLab department share ideas, focusing on the temporary expertise gained as part of their projects, rather than the outcome. The workshop was articulated around one of their given assignments. Students were asked to develop a specific object or context to help focus or explain content.

The format is clear: two persons, discussions, filmed from above.
the space is : two stools and a table.

* Foundation Year

 

The CMYK Colour Model


Tuesday, February 4, 2014

the CMYK colour model is short for cyan-magenta-yellow-key (black) and refers to all colours as mixtures of these four process colours. so, within this model, a colour would be described through the quotient of cyan, magenta, yellow and black that can be found in the mixture.

the CMYK colour model is predominantly used in the printing process and is often referred to as four-colour printing (which corresponds to the four inks used). in order to fully understand it, it is vital that we examine another colour model named RGB (red, green, blue) that is used in display devices such as computer monitors. so, whatever you see on a screen is in RGB. however, these colours can only be viewed with the aid of natural or produced light – making it impossible for documents to be printed as exact copies of what can be seen on a screen. this is why these documents must have their colours translated into CMYK prior to sending it to the printer.

all the heavily paraphrased information above seems to make sense on a superficial level, but in fact i find it all extremely perplexing and difficult to grasp. unfortunately i never learned the complex language of science and since it is awfully strenuous to translate a language one doesn’t understand, here is the even-more-technical-side explained by someone who seems to know what they are talking about:

“When two RGB colors are mixed equally they produce the colors of the CMYK model, known as subtractive primaries. green and blue creates cyan (C), red and blue creates magenta (M), and red and green creates yellow (Y). black is added to the model because it cannot be created with the 3 subtractive primaries (when combined they create a dark brown). The K, or “key,” stands for black.” (taken from here)

subtractive-colour_redu

upon my investigation, i found that the aspect of the CYMK colour model that i found most compelling was the simple fact that a countless amount of colours are but a mixture of four: cyan, magenta, yellow and black. this thought was inevitably on my mind for days proceeding my research.

 

//

the idea for a translation of the CYMK model came to me when i was listening to Billie holiday’s  1941 version of “am i blue?” over a cup of coffee. it started me off on a long trail of thought which went a little like this:

blue? blue?! how has blue come to mean a sad & melancholic mood or person?

although the colour blue is used to describe a specific feeling, colour can also be used to illustrate mood or atmosphere – for instance – in less direct ways. this is apparent in art, music, poetry, prose… but why do we associate certain moods or meanings with certain colours? and more even-more-generally: why do we often have the urge to illustrate colourless things through colour?

i am extremely fond of the randomness of this occurrence  the randomness of the colour blue (with all its different tones) being chosen to represent something that is beyond blue literally, as a colour, a sensory experience…

 

//

i had the idea of translating the CYMK colour system in a way that i made each colour (cyan, yellow, magenta and black) represent something different. and so i did. i decided that i was going to translate this system into a system that determined the “colour” of one’s day. first, i made a list of things that tend to have an effect on my day. then i selected the four that i felt have the most influence on the “mood” of my day. i proceeded to make them into questions (which can be answered on a scale of 1 to 10):

- how happy/satisfied are you with yourself today? (C)
- how well rested do you feel? (M)
- how good does today’s weather make you feel? (Y)
- how similar is today to yesterday? (K)

each of these questions substitute C, M, Y, and K accordingly. and when answered as a numeral value (from 1 to 10), i have the percentages i need to make a colour with the aid of photoshop. the system i’ve created is therefore a colour-determining tool.

i decided that the colour i’d silkscreen would be the result of my answers to the questions the morning after i created the system. my answers were 5, 5, 3, 1 and made into percentages as shown below:

 

 …and “the colour of my day” beside my silk-screened circle version:

 circle_redu

 

//

i knew that to develop my project further i’d have to send this survey around and ask people to fill it out. therefore, i made an online survey using a survey-making-website (which can be accessed here):

 

this website organized the data which i later used to determine individual colours for each of the 40 people world-wide who answered my survey on the 12th of december, 2013. i mapped out all 40 colours to illustrate the colours of one day, according to the answers of 40 people:

colour-system_redu

 

a problem i encountered on two occasions was that if 10 (being absolutely) was the answer to the last question: how similar is today to yesterday? (K), then the colour would be entirely black. since the other quotients would be cancelled out, i didn’t want this to happen. so instead, i set the percentage as 95% rather than 100%. even though both appear to be black anyway, i like the idea that there are still undertones of colour. and although it did not stay completely ‘honest’ to my original system – at the time i thought it would be a good compromise.

 

//

after i was done with the poster shown above, i decided to design a survey of my own (which i would put online and use if i were any good at computing):

i think through this translated colour system, i managed to play on the randomness of colour representations, but also create a functional and fun system (which also has the potential of becoming interactive).

colour-system_total_redu

 

A “light” summary of color


Tuesday, February 4, 2014

When we think of light and colors the first thing we think of is the RGB color model.
The RGB color model is an additive model based on red, green and blue colored lights. When added together in various ways, they can produce a wide range of colors. The name of this system comes from the initials of red, green and blue.

HueSystemRGB The RGB color system’s main purpose is to display images in electronic systems, such as televisions and computers, although it’s also been used in conventional photography.

This system is based off of the Young-Helmholtz theory of trichromatic color vision. This is a theory developed by Thomas Young and Herman Helmholtz in the early to mid 19th century.

Trichromacy is a condition in which one has 3 channels to convey color information. Humans are trichromats. Each channel has a different absorption spectra, thus showing the viewer a different color. Young came up with this theory in 1802. Herman von Helmholtz brought the theory further in 1850 by classifying each wave length under the colors blue, green and red.

James Clerk Maxwell elaborated on this by creating a color triangle in 1860. He is the founder of color photography. He proposed in 1855 to take 3 black and white photographs and run them through red, green and blue filters. Each filter was projected on a different projector, and when superimposed, the human eye percieved a colored reproduction of the scene.

2474164072_d421085ba2_z The RGB system is also used for display screens, such as televisions or computers. Each pixel on the screen is built by driving three small and very close but still seperated RGB light sources. From a normal viewing distance the seperate colors are indistinguishable tricking the eye into seeing a solid color.

colour wheel Here is a silkscreen print of a single colored circle made to represent the RGB color model. I chose to print the circle white because i felt that it would be the most accurate way to represent the entire system. The reason being, as you can see on the RGB color wheel, the combination of red, green and blue lights create a white light.

An other project I did was to create a projected piece based of the RGB system. I felt it would be interesting to base myself off the color wheel to create a less scientific but more abstract version of it.

These are the initial sketches I came up with: Screen Shot 2013-12-13 at 10.51.42 AM

 

I ended up choosing this one sketch for my final piece. Because this is a theory purely based off light, it does not work if only on paper. I needed to find a way to implicate this color wheel to something involving light. Therefor, I decided to scan and project this color wheel to a wall. By using a projector, the piece based of light and thus appropriate for this system.

How ever, i felt this was not enough. So with Photoshop, I divided the piece into three by separating it into channels: Red, Green and Blue. This way, i could go back to the origins of this model which is based on the addition of those three colors.

Screen Shot 2013-12-13 at 10.51.20 AM Screen Shot 2013-12-13 at 10.51.57 AM Screen Shot 2013-12-13 at 10.52.09 AM

After transferring these images into jpeg’s, I placed them into the iMovie software and created a short one second film. When running this film using a Quicktime loop, I created a gif.
Finally, this gif is then projected on a wall, completing the piece :

 

Get the Flash Player to see this player.

 

Colorsystem: Michel Albert-Vanel


Tuesday, February 4, 2014

[1] Colours are not abstract concepts but real sensations, usually experienced not in isolation, but in groups.

 

So the context of the colour is everything. I like that thought. Because if you but a nerd behind a computer, it’s a boring nerd. Put the same nerd in a fashionable surrounding, and it looks like its all on purpose. SO HIP!

So the way of experiencing is how we see life. The context of your childhood, experiences, surrounding, moment, etc. is how you will experience the moment.

 

In this case the moment is the colour.

For example. Red meat next to a white plastic fake leave, it will bring out the meat,  and it doesn’t look like a battle field where  all the cows and pigs died, it also reminds me of something fancy.

What about when you take red, the colour of passion love anger, but put it next to yellow it looks like a joke.

 

You can change a whole meaning of something by just adding one colour.

 

But what happens if you put a other colour. Then there is a layer of meaning and experiencing. And what if you put another and another and more and more.

Where is the line between chaos, and experiencing a colour ore a contect.

 

This system sounds like a organizing system, what colour you should mix with the next so create a contect you can experience. So you can decorate your house, your styling, your plate.

And if you want something totally different just put on other colour and a whole new world will arrive.

 

The planetary system introduces new parameters in order to describe the context in which a colour exists. A «planetary colour-system» is put forward in order to be able to account for the effects of the colour sensations. Three new parameters are introduced to describe the context in which a colour exists. The order is represented by planets appearing as the primary colours, orbited by numerous small moons as secondary colours.

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02van

ENJOY YOUR CONTEXT OF COLOUR

 

[2]So, we had the assignment to make something with and out of this colour system. i wanted to do something with photography, so i took this colour system and made pictures of objects i found, for example a green fake grass object, and then put a other colour next to it, for example a other red ashtray, and then again put an other colour next to that, to see what happend with the contextof the colour you start out with.

For example the ashstray i mentiond allready, and the green grass object, and then put a bit of grey ash in the ashtray, what does the red object to the green, and the other way around. Do they complement, the red is carrying the green ore the other way around.

Because, colours are not abstract concepts but real sensations, usually experienced not in isolation, but in groups. We not only associate these groups with each other, but perceive them in their entirety.

And does the gray have a extra factor in the red, or not.

GRAS GRAS ROOD

 

What do you get when you put all the colours to gether you’ve get BLACK, what is the effect of the colour black next to the colours, because of this question i choose BLACK -

(is the color of coal, ebony, and of outer space. It is the darkest color, the result of the absence of or complete absorption of light. It is the opposite ofwhite and often represents darkness in contrast with light.Black was one of the first colors used by artists in neolithic cave paintings. In the Roman Empire, it became the color of mourning, and over the centuries it was frequently associated with death, evil, witches and magic. In the 14th century, it began to be worn by royalty, the clergy, judges and government officials in much of Europe. It became the color worn by English romantic poets, businessmen and statesmen in the 19th century, and a high fashion color in the 20th century.) 

- as a colour for my circle. If you put it in the middle of all the colour circles, does it have a other feeling then all the other colours.

 

BLACK CIRCLE

Explicit variables


Tuesday, February 4, 2014

The DIN color-system.
I started learning about the DIN system and i will try to explain you about it.

When i went looking for this system on google, i didn’t find much. I had some struggles dealing with the explanations, and ofcourse they also had interesting words in it which i didn’t knew the exact meaning of.

I am going to explain to you the DIN color-system in my own words, and hopefully you will get it and than maybe you can explain it to me again.

street_art_paint_war_berlin

D deutsche I institut N für normung

The colour-system started development in 1941 on the initiative of the Deutschen Normenausschusses in Germany.

They recognised the need for a more practical color-system than the Ostwald system. The Ostwald system was used since the First World War.

By psychological experiments, they created an order in addition to a circle of 24 color-hues and a saturation scale, introduced a darkness scale as a special parameter for establishing the relative brightness of non-self-illuminating colors. (copied text)

They attempt to show equal distances in defined color series, the idea was to create a color-system operating with the explicit variables of colour-hue [x], saturation [x] and brightness. And than in the most perfect way.

The main aim is a technical application in close connection with colorimetry. (copied text)

I put in some images in the text as you see, those are the technical images of the DIN color system. The explanations of these where nowhere to find, but when you take a look at the other color systems here on the blog, you can have an idea of how it works. Because in a way they all want to show their perfect way of showing colors.

01din 02din 01mun

In the end i get what the institute wanted to create, but then if i take a look at the technical part of the system my attentions fades away. And there was not enough information (for me) to find the completely explanations.

DIN6164Colorsystem

 
As you can read in the text, you can see that the colour-hue [x], saturation [x] and brightness are important in the whole story of the DIN system. In my case I heard and I see these 3 words a lot. Especially while using Photoshop. But what do I exactly do, while using these adjustments?
In the process of learning about a color system for me it’s important that it’s fun, because learning for me is not the most fun and easiest to do. So I started thinking of a nice way to learn about hue, saturation and brightness. First I came up with making pictures of it. But how? I don’t even now exactly the difference between the 3, and how to show it in pictures?
I took my laptop and started playing with the 3 things in Photoshop. I made pictures of white objects on a black background.

HUE

hue

SATURATION

saturation

BRIGHTNESS

brightnes

 

After I made these adjustments on the picture I thought of a way to present it. Immediately I thought of a flip-book. And this is what I did.

 

IMG_1405_reduIMG_1407_reduIMG_1409_redu

Get the Flash Player to see this player.

 

Well now I know the basic importance of the DIN system, and I think also a lot of other color systems haha.
If I had to show the system in one colour? …The most purest and perfect RED.

IMG_1438_redu

 


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